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GROUP CITATION for BRAVERY - CITATIONS

Awardees comprise members of the New South Wales State Emergency Service, Nundle, NSW, a member of the Rural Fire Service and a local volunteer

Late on the night of 19 November 2000 and into the morning of the following day, members of the New South Wales State Emergency Service, a member of the Rural Fire Service and a member of the community, assisted in the evacuation and rescue of residents during a flash flood in the northern New South Wales town of Nundle.

Torrential rain started falling in the Nundle area late at night and within a short time local creeks were flooding. The Nundle area branch of the State Emergency Service was receiving calls for help from local residents stranded by the rapidly rising floodwaters. With only the light of their vehicles to guide them and with the ever-present danger of logs and other potentially lethal debris flowing through the floodwaters, the group worked to evacuate and rescue residents, trapped in their homes, and colleagues, whose rescue vehicles were caught in the floodwaters. Their efforts continued throughout the night.

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In July 1991 the ship's company of the oil rig tender "LADY KATHLEEN" displayed high courage which, aided by initiative and exemplary seamanship, enabled them to avert a major pollution disaster by removing a stricken oil tanker to safety. On the morning of 21 July 1991 "LADY KATHLEEN" responded to an emergency call from a burning oil tanker which had lost its bow in heavy seas off the reefs north west of Wedge Island. When "LADY KATHLEEN" arrived the tanker was spilling oil and being driven shorewards. Operating in conditions of extreme hazard and difficulty, with strong winds and heavy seas and in imminent danger of conflagration, "LADY KATHLEEN" closed on the tanker to pick up a useable line streaming from its stern. A towing attempt was frustrated when the line parted. Returning to the danger zone, "LADY KATHLEEN" lay alongside the tanker and succeeded in putting a line party aboard, enabling the connection of a towing rig. Despite the difficult conditions "LADY KATHLEEN" was able to hold the tanker until wind and sea abated sufficiently to enable her to tow the vessel further off shore. Throughout this demanding action, the ship's company of the "LADY KATHLEEN" maintianed a calm and purposeful dedication to the operation and performed their dangerous tasks with courage and enterprise.

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On the afternoon of 8 December 1988 an Iroquois helicopter took off from Royal Australian Air Force Base, Fairbairn, in response to a request to evacuate two 16-year-old girls suffering from hypothermia from a camp site in the Koscuisko National Park. On arrival in the Park two attempts were made to reach the camp site; they both failed. The crew was then told that the condition of the girls was deteriorating. While aware of the hazardous nature of flying in conditions of low cloud, continuous rain, snow patches and failing light it was decided that a third attempt should be made to evacuate the hypothermic girls. Windy conditions severely restricted the operations of the helicopter. At this attempt the crew was successful in bringing the helicopter to a position at the camp site where it was possible to place the evacuees in it. The crew was then advised that two more girls were suffering from hypothermia and their condition was critical. They too were loaded into the helicopter which by this time was in excess of its authorised weight limit for the prevailing conditions. Following a power assessment the helicopter was manoeuvred to a point where it could fly down the Snowy River Valley to Cooma. The transit flight to the Cooma Hospital was completed without incident.

Accordingly this warrant is issued in recognition of the bravery in extraordinary circumstances of Flying Officer Weir, Flying Officer Murray, Flight Sergeant Green, Sergeant Hayton and Leading Aircraftman Chenoweth of No. 5 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force.

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On the night of 1 April 1990 "D" Platoon from New South Wales Fire Brigades Station 5, Newtown, was the first to respond to a major fire and explosions in a liquid petroleum gas tank farm at St Peters. With tow of the tanks and a road tanker burning and an explosion likely, "D" Platoon operated a tanker burning and an explosion likely, "D" Platoon operated a pumper from an advanced position to provide pressure over the emptying liquid petroleum gas tanks. Despite the hazards of their position, "D" Platoon continued to operate the unit until the order to evacuate was given. Shortly after their withdrawal from the danger zone the first of a series of boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions took place.

Accordingly this warrant is issued in recognition of the bravery in extraordinary circumstances of Firefighter Sean Edward Dewling, Firefighter Mark David Tanswell and Station Officer Silvio Ventura.

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In July 1991 the ship's company of the oil rig tender "LADY KATHLEEN" displayed high courage which, aided by initiative and exemplary seamanship, enabled them to avert a major pollution disaster by removing a stricken oil tanker to safety. On the morning of 21 July 1991 "LADY KATHLEEN" responded to an emergency call from a burning oil tanker which had lost its bow in heavy seas off the reefs north west of Wedge Island. When "LADY KATHLEEN" arrived the tanker was spilling oil and being driven shorewards. Operating in conditions of extreme hazard and difficulty, with strong winds and heavy seas and in imminent danger of conflagration, "LADY KATHLEEN" closed on the tanker to pick up a useable line streaming from its stern. A towing attempt was frustrated when the line parted. Returning to the danger zone, "LADY KATHLEEN" lay alongside the tanker and succeeded in putting a line party aboard, enabling the connection of a towing rig. Despite the difficult conditions "LADY KATHLEEN" was able to hold the tanker until wind and sea abated sufficiently to enable her to tow the vessel further off shore. Throughout this demanding action, the ship's company of the "LADY KATHLEEN" maintianed a calm and purposeful dedication to the operation and performed their dangerous tasks with courage and enterprise.

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Members on board the oil rig tender "LADY KATHLEEN" on 21 July 1991, in recognition of bravery in exceptional circumstances.

In July 1991 the ship's company of the oil rig tender "LADY KATHLEEN" displayed high courage which, aided by initiative and exemplary seamanship, enabled them to avert a major pollution disaster by removing a stricken oil tanker to safety. On the morning of 21 July 1991 "LADY KATHLEEN" responded to an emergency call from a burning oil tanker which had lost its bow in heavy seas off the reefs north west of Wedge Island. When "LADY KATHLEEN" arrived the tanker was spilling oil and being driven shorewards. Operating in conditions of extreme hazard and difficulty, with strong winds and heavy seas and in imminent danger of conflagration, "LADY KATHLEEN" closed on the tanker to pick up a useable line streaming from its stern. A towing attempt was frustrated when the line parted. Returning to the danger zone, "LADY KATHLEEN" lay alongside the tanker and succeeded in putting a line party aboard, enabling the connection of a towing rig. Despite the difficult conditions "LADY KATHLEEN" was able to hold the tanker until wind and sea abated sufficiently to enable her to tow the vessel further off shore. Throughout this demanding action, the ship's company of the "LADY KATHLEEN" maintained a calm and purposeful dedication to the operation and performed their dangerous tasks with courage and enterprise.

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Crew members of Western Australia Police Force Air Wing, Jandakot, in recognition of bravery in exceptional circumstances on 21 July 1991.

On the morning of 21 July 1991, Special Constable Mayo, Special Constable Rudge, Special Constable Rudrum and Special Constable Whitfield flew 24 sorties in the Police Helicopter Polair, under hazardous and difficult conditions to rescue 24 crew members from a stricken oil tanker off the Western Australian coast. Operating in conditions of extremely low visibility, strong winds and severe turbulence Polair winched individuals from the deck of the tanker and carried them ashore in batches of three and four. During the morning, despite further deterioration in the conditions, Polair's crew made frequent returns to the tanker and although aware of the added dangers from the ship's superstructure in the violent seas, operated from a low level to winch aboard more survivors from the stricken tanker, and remained with the vessel until the evacuation was completed.

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